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Mystery do-gooder is leaving flowers and handwritten notes for strangers around London
18/01/2018

A KIND-HEARTED Londoner is leaving handwritten notes for lucky strangers in a bid to "remind people they are extraordinary." The mystery person has been leaving motivational letters and bunches of flowers in Hackney, east London, in a bid to spread the love.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13148180118


The origin of flower-making genes
18/01/2018
Flowering plants have evolved from plants without flowers. It is known that the function of several genes, called MADS-box genes, creates shapes peculiar to flowers such as stamens, pistils and petals.
creates shapes peculiar to flowers such as stamens, pistils and petals. Plants that do not produce flowers, such as mosses, ferns and green algae, are also known to have the MADS-box genes.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-flower-making-genes.html#jCp
creates shapes peculiar to flowers such as stamens, pistils and petals. Plants that do not produce flowers, such as mosses, ferns and green algae, are also known to have the MADS-box genes.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-flower-making-genes.html#jCp
creates shapes peculiar to flowers such as stamens, pistils and petals. Plants that do not produce flowers, such as mosses, ferns and green algae, are also known to have the MADS-box genes.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-flower-making-genes.html#jCp

http://www.flowerexperts.com/13147180118

Scientists Solve Mystery of How Flowers Conquered the World
18/01/2018
(CN) – A team of researchers may have discovered how flowering plants were able to take over ecosystems across the world so rapidly, a phenomenon that Charles Darwin called an “abominable mystery.” Scientists have speculated for more than 200 years about the success and remarkable diversity of flowering plants, which have fueled a significant portion of modern animal diversity and serve as the basis of our food system. Writing Thursday in the journal PLOS Biology, the team shows that the plants’ dominance stems from a small genome. “The flowering plants are the most important group of plants on earth, and now we finally know why they have been so successful,” the authors write. Research over the past 30 years shows flowering plants have unrivaled rates of photosynthesis, enabling them to develop faster and outcompete conifers and ferns that had dominated ecosystems for hundreds of millions of years. Flowering plants’ metabolic success stems from their specialized leaves, which accelerate water transport and carbon dioxide uptake. These anatomical advancements are directly linked to genome size, according to the team. Since each cell features a copy of a plant’s genome, smaller genomes enable cells to be smaller, which, in turn, allows more cells to be packed into a specific volume of space. Shrinking the size of each cell can also make nutrient and water delivery more efficient. After examining hundreds of species, the researchers determined that genome downsizing began around 140 million years ago during the early Cretaceous period, and aligned with the global spread of the first flowering plants. “The flowering plants are highly competitive in almost every terrestrial ecosystem, and their rapid rise during the early Cretaceous period irrevocably altered terrestrial primary productivity and global climate,” the researchers write. While the report answers a long-standing question, the findings present several mysteries. Future research could examine how flowering plants were able to shrink their genomes more than other plant species, which innovations in genome packing and structure the plants capitalized on, and how ferns and conifers managed to avoid extinction despite their comparatively large genomes and cells.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13146180118

A Photography Display Infused with the Scent of Flowers
18/01/2018
PHILADELPHIA — There is a photography exhibition at Vox Populi infused with the scent of flowers and forests. The photographs, by Jay Muhlin, chronicle the life of, in the artist’s own words, “a young girl who he is helping raise.” The girl in question displays a whole range of childlike behaviors — playing in a garden, in various costumes, mugging for the camera. The combination of photography with scent is a curious, if slightly unsettling one. Photography is still held to have some measure of honesty, or a documentary nature to the images it captures (or, more accurately, creates); yet smell is less objective, since it conjures up memories and associations in immediate, primal, and affective ways. I wondered, as I looked at these girlhood snapshots — of her grimacing for the camera in plastic vampire teeth, or lying facedown in a bank of snow — whether my perception was being manipulated by that sweet smell, which primes us to feel happy and at peace.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13145180118

Scented winter flowers
18/01/2018
To me there is nothing in the garden that is as uplifting as fragrance, particularly in the darkest depths of winter. Catching an unexpected whiff of the scent of summer on a cold, grey day when dashing out the front door or walking to the bus stop is one of the everyday surprises which makes gardening so magical.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13149180118

UK gardens threatened by 'game changing' plant disease from Europe
03/01/2018
A "game changing" plant disease could spread to the UK and put gardens at risk, experts have warned. The bacterial pest Xylella fastidiosa has caused widespread problems in mainland Europe, wiping out entire groves of ancient olive trees in Italy and Spain. A European Food Safety Authority report found the disease is capable of infecting over 300 plant species, including lavender, rosemary and flowering cherry. The disease could arrive in the UK on imported plants and threaten British gardens, according to the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS). The bacteria restrict water movement in plants, causing their eventual death.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13144180103

Goatgrams: Flower delivery service’s goats eat the bouquet
03/01/2018
Brett Wilson tends to leave a mess. “I’m probably the only person who has defiled an office and had people appreciate it,” said Wilson, 46, of Washougal. It’s not Wilson doing to the defiling, technically. It’s Om Nom or Nibbles, his Nigerian dwarf goats, who stand roughly 2 1/2 feet tall and weigh between 30 and 40 pounds. In September, he started Goatgrams, a flower delivery service in which Wilson will hand-pick flowers from his farm and deliver them anywhere in the Portland-Vancouver area along with Om Nom and Nibbles, who will also eat the bouquet of flowers, lettuce and kale. “I knew people would want to see goats eat flowers,” he said. “They’re unbelievably cute and playful.” Earlier this month, Wilson packed Om Nom and Nibbles into his Honda Element for a delivery to Portland’s Dennison Capen Group Realty, where some coworkers ordered a Goatgram for Megan Winnerling. The coworkers met Wilson outside and hid him behind a wall in the courtyard. One of Winnerling’s colleagues held the bouquet and handed it to her as she walked outside. She was unsure what was going on, and then Wilson, Om Nom and Nibbles popped out.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13143180103

Flowers, quinoa chocolate, mushroom tea and more food trends for 2018, according to Whole Foods
03/01/2018
Eat falafel, flowers and seaweed tacos in the new year. Food trends from Middle Eastern culinary feasts to super powders like matcha and mushrooms are in for 2018, Whole Foods Market predicts in its annual list of buzzy food and drinks. The grocery store, which acquired Amazon earlier this year, surveyed its global buyers and sommeliers to round up what consumers will be purchasing more of next year.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13142180103

Flowers Have Hidden Heat Signals That Attract Pollinating Bees
03/01/2018
It is well understood how flowers use complex color patterns and smells to attract pollinating bees. But now, scientists have discovered that flowers also emit heat to advertise themselves to insects — creating temperature arrays that mimic the color designs of petals. On average, heat spots were 4 to 5 degrees Celsius warmer than the rest of the flower, but could be as much as 11 degrees warmer. To test how significant these heat signatures are in insects’ pollinating behaviors, scientists from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom created artificial flowers that only had temperature patterns, not colors or smells. They found that bumblebees were able to use the patterns — invisible to the human eye — to distinguish between different flower species and the pollen they provided. They published the research earlier this month in the journal eLife.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13141180103

Spring flowers in autumn, birdsong in winter: what a freak year for nature
03/01/2018
When I was growing up, in the 1960s and 1970s, we had what my nan used to call “proper weather”. Snow in winter, showers in spring, sun (or at least, sunny intervals) in summer and gales in autumn. Britain’s weather may have been changeable by the day, but the seasons were seemingly set in stone, with a reassuringly predictable regularity. That certainly suited the country’s fauna and flora. Wild animals and plants, and by extension their habitats, evolved to cope with short-term unpredictability and long-term stability. If change did occur, it happened slowly, over decades or centuries; rather than rapidly, in a single year.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13140180103

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